September 23, 2017

PA RtI Implementer’s Forum

Gearing up to present with Andy McCrea tomorrow as part of PaTTAN’s RtI Implementer’s Forum tomorrow. As Andy and I were updating the PowerPoint this past week, we realized we’ve been speaking on this topic for 5 years now! It’s been interesting to see the evolution of awareness in our participants over time. Many more participants have access to curriculum-based measurement (CBM) data than when we first started. Even more have figured out how to graph data and generate trend lines in Microsoft Excel, some without realizing they are essentially computing linear regression statistics! We’ve presented for a range of audiences that started out as mainly school psychologists but has expanded to teams who are implementing components of RtI in their schools. Tomorrow’s workshop is formatted for just that – teams! Should be another great interactive workshop!

RtI Implementer’s Forum Link

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Defining Rate of Improvement

If you were to open your old graduate level stats book, you might not find the phrase “rate of improvement,” in the index, but you would find some text on “slope.” Essentially, they are synonymous terms, one being slightly more angled toward the positive.

In algebraic terms, rate of improvement can be defined as the vertical change (y-axis) over the horizontal change (x-axis). More simply put, slope is the rise over run. Or the steepness of a line. The key word here is line. In order to calculate slope, one must first have a line. Once a line is determined, the formula for calculating slope is:

m = (y2 – y1) / (x2 – x1)

m = slope
(x1, y1) = one point on the line
(x2, y2) = a second point on the line

Typically, when we plot student data, we end up looking at data points on a graph. Some commercially available systems provide a general line as a guide approximating where the student’s data points should fall. With just this information, there is no line from which we could calculate an accurate slope. Therefore, we have to create that line! It is the position of the authors of this site that linear regression is the best method for calculating an accurate line to determine rate of improvement.

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